How get Email from user profile?

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Luca Santaniello's picture
Joined: 2011-06-10
Jun 23, 2011
How get Email from user profile?

Hi all,I need get email from user profile.I get Person class istance but I don't found email field.Person profile = client.getProfileForCurrentUser(.....);How can I do it?Thanks in advanceLuca

Luca Santaniello's picture
Joined: 2011-06-10
Jun 26, 2011

Nothing help for me?

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Jun 28, 2011

As documented on the Profile Fields documentation, email is not a supported field.

Luca Santaniello's picture
Joined: 2011-06-10
Jun 30, 2011

Thanks Kirsten Jones, I read it. I need other way to read the current user's email address? Exist it?ThanksLS

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Jun 30, 2011

All you can do is ask the user.  We don't supply that information for applications using the Open API.  You can send messages using the LinkedIn API to their mailbox...

rahul kumar's picture
Joined: 2011-07-27
Jul 29, 2011

Hi Kirsten,
I am also facing the same problem. The scenario is like :
the user logs in by using the linkedin login button on a html page.
Can we get the email id used to login on LinkedIn, or the primary email address registered with LinkedIN, through REST api or javascript ?

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Jul 30, 2011

The user's email is not available through the API.

rahul kumar's picture
Joined: 2011-07-27
- (Reply to #7) Aug 1, 2011

So are you guys working in this direction, (to make user's basic email visible/accessible through APIs) or It is not at all supported by LinkedIN ?

Jeremy Johnstone's picture
Joined: 2011-04-17
- (Reply to #8) Aug 3, 2011

As documented and explicitly detailed by Kirsten above, it is not supported by LinkedIn.

Michael Kelly's picture
Joined: 2011-08-15
Aug 27, 2011

I have a website with a conventional login page, to which I have added a LinkedIn login button so the user can log in by either method.

I would like to create a local account for users who login via LinkedIn so that the user can edit their own profile information. The problem comes when the user creates a conventional account first, and then logs in via LinkedIn subsequently. I do not want to create 2 accounts for the same user so I need to be able to recognise that there is an existing account. The obvious solution would have been to do this using their email address, but as this is not available, has anyone else worked out another solution?

Colin Bell's picture
Joined: 2011-09-12
Sep 13, 2011

I must throw my hat in here. You can get a persons main address, telephone number, date of birth and several other identifying bits of profile information, but you cannot get their email address! In modern web applications, the email address is a vital individual identifier. Integrating a registration system with Linked-in is impossible without this information.

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Sep 13, 2011

Several companies have successfully integrated registration systems with LinkedIn by asking the user for their email, or tying it into their registration system using the LinkedIn ID returned by the login plugin. We do not expose the user's email because our authentication system is not yet granular enough that we can tell the user that that's what's being exposed, and we are protective of our user's privacy.

The email address wouldn't actually be a 100% solution in any case, as users frequently have several emails for different systems (such as linkedin@mydomain.com, facebook@mydomain.com) to organize their incoming mail.

So, while it is more challenging, perhaps, for the registration system that you are building, it is certainly not impossible. And you would need to deal with the fact that users have multiple email addresses in any case.

John Jones's picture
Joined: 2010-01-01
Sep 15, 2011

Kirsten is correct. The email address is not a sure fire way to ensure the link up. My approach is that in order for a user to use my app, the user must first register. This registration process first involves collecting the user's email address that they enter themselves along with their password, first and last name. Then they hit the Login with Linkedin button which then puts them through the Linkedin Oauth process and now I have the email they entered associated with their Linkedin ID. Now the user can login with our standard login or with their Linkedin login.

Basically, you can do what you want to do but you need to do it during the user registration process to link up your standard login account with your linkedin login account.

You would be well advised not to depend on the Linkedin Login process and provide your own login process in your app. This Linkedin API stuff is free and the entire thing can get deprecated at any time for any reason or they can deprecate you and your app and then leave your users no way to get into your app if you do not have your own login facility.

John Jones's picture
Joined: 2010-01-01
- (Reply to #10) Sep 15, 2011

Michael, you might want to look at a 3rd party registration and authentication solution that I think solves this problem. This service supports more than just Linkedin and lets you integrate many other social media login facilities. The services is called Janrain: http://www.janrain.com/products/engage

John Jones's picture
Joined: 2010-01-01
- (Reply to #9) Sep 15, 2011

Jeremy, it is my hope that Linkedin never provides a facility to anyone, including partners, to have access to the email address of a profile. That would open users up to untold amounts of spam and unsolicited correspondence.

There are design solutions that any developer can implement to deail with the need for the email address but they involve the user voluntarily providing their email address to the app as part of the registration process. It is not required that Linkedin provide the email address. I hope that it will stay that way.

Joined: 2011-02-13
Sep 16, 2011

Jeremy,

DOB and main address are right below twitter-accounts in profile fields. A phone numbers collection is available as well. It appears this information is only available for the member and the member's connections.

Now if the user doesn't provide the information we can't expose them. I consider my birthday to be very private and an essential piece to gaining access to my credit report where as the email address is not. I agree with John's assertion to a point, but I can always change my email address. It is hard to change my birthday... :).

date-of-birth person Current user and connections member's birth date May return only month and day, but not year, or all three, depending on information provided.
main-address person Current user and connections address Could be home, work, etc. We do not identify which one.

https://developer.linkedin.com/documents/profile-fields

Justin Wilcox's picture
Joined: 2009-12-28
Sep 24, 2011

Kristen & Jeremy,

The inability to get an authenticated user's primary email address via your API, is limiting its adoption.

We wanted to let users sign in with LinkedIn at www.OnCompare.com, but since we'd have to ask for their email address after they've already granted us access to their LinkedIn profile, we decided it wasn't worth introducing another barrier to registration. Might as well use our own registration mechanism.

Same holds true for an unrelated mobile app we're developing now.

Next time there's an internal meeting at LinkedIn to discuss this, some fuel for the fight:

1) From a user's perspective, speedy & painless registration is one of the primary benefits of 3rd-party login. To slow that process down by asking for information that is already available to the 3rd party, largely eliminates this benefit.

2) Users don't know you won't give us their email address. They're used to authenticating with Facebook and Twitter, which don't require they provide their email address at registration time. If our sites/apps let them sign-in with LinkedIn, and then ask for their email address (which they know you have), our service doesn't look well designed.

3) We don't want to manager our user's email/password. Since more and more users are comfortable using 3rd-party logins, and a number of services provide adequate functionality to developers (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Google, etc.), there may come a time when these other services eat LinkedIn's lunch. Because of our audience, we'd prefer to sign in with LinkedIn, but since that's not a great option now, we're forced to decide...writing our own registration system or login with Twitter & Facebook?

You can make the choice easy on us, and increase your adoption, by enabling us to get a user's email address. :)

Thanks,
Justin

Andrea Batazzi's picture
Joined: 2011-09-16
Sep 30, 2011

Facebook,twitter, google(openid) expose the email address. I think you should reconsider....

Stephane Eybert's picture
Joined: 2011-09-20
Oct 5, 2011

When the LinkedIn people say it is not supported, it is not from any technical inability, it is by design. They do not want to offer the email address of their users. That's fine. Simply ask your user for his email address after he has logged in with the LinkeIn button.

Abhilash Goje's picture
Joined: 2011-10-13
Oct 14, 2011

I also agree with other users. LinkedIn needs to reconsider the option to expose email address on a successful authentication. When you show the user a dialog (where he grants permission to our website), you can clearly specify a point to the user that the website will be reading his email address. Leave the next choice on the user. If he does not want the website to read the email, he will not grant permission and leave. Having the user id and email id are the two very basic technical needs (just like bread and butter) of any application that's dealing with user base.

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Oct 14, 2011

This is functionality we're looking at adding in the future, but our current authentication granularity doesn't allow for that information to be requested of the user.

Mike Griffin's picture
Joined: 2011-06-16
Oct 27, 2011

I also agree allowing access to the email is needed.

What is the point of having an app authenticated by Linkedin and then not have a method to communicate to the user. (perhaps I am missing something here - but how is an app supposed to communicate with its users)

This is why Facebook opted to provide the email so app developers could provide updates and emails through their app to the end user.

The proposed method of "asking" the user for an email after authenticating via linkedin is going backwards. The idea of using linkedin for authentication is to speed up the signing up process for app users. If you then have an additional process to "ask" the user for the email you then also need to add verification by email because what is to stop a user putting any email address in here.

If you are adding verification by email into your app signup process you have slowed down the whole sign up mechanism again and so what is the advantage of using linkedin's api??

Andre Thomas's picture
Joined: 2011-11-06
Nov 11, 2011

Any news on this issue to offer the obviously needed email adress of an authorized User via the API for creating an effective Application ?? Would you please reveal the latest informations

Samantha Cunningham's picture
Joined: 2011-11-16
Nov 16, 2011

Can someone help me? I am trying to get my Linkedin Emails sent to 1 email. It sends some email to 1 email address I used to have on file and the rest to my only email address I have on file. Can someone please help?!?

Samantha Cunningham's picture
Joined: 2011-11-16
Nov 16, 2011

Can someone help me? I am trying to get my Linkedin Emails sent to 1 email. It sends some email to 1 email address I used to have on file and the rest to my only email address I have on file. Can someone please help?!?

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Nov 17, 2011

This setting is done within the LinkedIn website (not using the APIs discussed here). Please check your "Settings" section and "Email preferences" to configure your email addresses. If you have problems with this, please go to the website help at http://help.linkedin.com

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Nov 17, 2011

This setting is done within the LinkedIn website (not using the APIs discussed here). Please check your "Settings" section and "Email preferences" to configure your email addresses. If you have problems with this, please go to the website help at http://help.linkedin.com

Alex Pryiomka's picture
Joined: 2011-11-22
Nov 22, 2011

Bad for you.

Then I (as well as other devs) am not using linkedin for user authentication.

I will go with Live ID, yahoo, gmail, twitter. I got facebook already :):):):). It is too cumbersome to ask user for email because user may not provide valid email, so you have to ask user to validate email which is just too much for some users (you would need to send a validation url to users email, etc). The point of exposing email (if this email in user's profile, i assume that it was already validated by linkedin and I don't have to re-validate it) is that user uses one single login and get authenticated.

umesh awasthi's picture
Joined: 2011-11-16
Nov 29, 2011

Just to add my point to this.i have provided the OAuth with Google/Facebook/Yahoo/Window Live services and i was planning to add LinkedIn also but my application is based on the email verification system means we need to have a valid email id of the user that means i provide the login to my user with LinkedIn and than i ask him/her to provide me the email address and now i have to send some kind of email verification to ensure that email id provided by the user is valid and belongs to him/her.

So ended up to not offer LinkedIn OAuth functionality,hope if they provide this in future we can integrate that.Since even user have multiple email associated he/she always choose his primary email id.

Joined: 2011-12-12
Dec 12, 2011

Alex Pryiomka - Twitter API does not provide email id like linkedin does. why you developers are bothering about email id, just ask the user after oauth and complete the registration process. This is pretty much easier than anything. Facebook should also remove the option to provide email id as it a major security breach for users.

Joined: 2011-07-25
Dec 23, 2011

I agree with the other people here. Not having the email means stopping the registration process in the middle to ask for it. I may as well just ask for an email and password as well and do it manually.

Kristof Pelckmans's picture
Joined: 2011-11-18
Jan 9, 2012

Agree that the user's e-mail is vital for a third party. People growing more accustomed to logging in with their existing identities (Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, ...) on other web platforms. If the platform requires an e-mail address (whether it is for technical reasons or user experience, or other functional requirements), it should be able to get it from the identity profile.

I think the discussion should not evolve around whether or not to expose the e-mail address. SIMPLY LET THE USER DECIDE WHETHER (S)HE TRUSTS THE PARTY WITH HER/HIS PRIVATE INFORMATION.

I find your privacy argument weak since you do expose the user's birthday, phone, twitter, and full address. I understand you have multiple e-mail addresses for each user, for our requirement, the primary e-mail address would be sufficient.

Please adapt your authentication granularity so you (1) allow apps to ask for more fine-grained permissions (2) clearly communicate to the user what information you are exposing.

Some nice examples of permission based REST interfaces:
- Facebook: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/reference/api/permissions/
- Twitter: http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-api-announce/browse_thread/thread/e954fc0f8b5aa6ec
- Instagram: http://instagram.com/developer/auth/#scope

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Jan 9, 2012

I'll note that even with their increased granular permissions, Twitter doesn't expose email addresses either, so applications that use Twitter login also ask for an email address. Many users have different emails for each account (such as linkedin@myname.com) so asking the user which email they want to use makes sense.

In any case, I apologize if our model doesn't work for your application. If you need to use a different identity provider so you can use the email for identification, that makes sense. We are working on adding more permission granularity, but we have other features and needed improvements which are more strongly needed at this point.

Neil Munro's picture
Joined: 2011-10-03
Jan 16, 2012

I agree with Kristof Pelckmans, it should be up to the user not LinkedIn (and Twitter) to decide whether they want to share their email and as developers our applications risk disconnection if we abuse the emails.

If we do not get a validated email from you or Twitter, then not only do we have to prompt the user for an email, we have no idea if it is valid so we have to send our own confirmation email. This makes a mockery of the idea of simplifying things for everyone...

Joined: 2012-01-27
Jan 27, 2012

I agree with Neil. If Facebook has support for this with an 800+ million user base, I would think that linkedin could follow their lead.

Jeremy Johnstone's picture
Joined: 2011-04-17
Jan 27, 2012

Hi Anthony,

Facebook is not LinkedIn, LinkedIn is not Facebook. We have different target demographics and more importantly different expectations from our members on privacy of their data. What is applicable in a personal social context is in many cases very different than what makes sense in a professional setting. That said, we hear the message loud and clear and are working on solution to balance the desires of our members with the desires of our developers. For LinkedIn, the needs, wants, and desires of our members are the single most important thing to us and everything else comes second.

-Jeremy

Joined: 2012-01-27
Jan 27, 2012

Jeremy,

I know Linkedin is not Facebook and Facebook is not Linkedin, but Linkedin provides almost all the same information it's its api that Facebook does "accept" for the email address. The fact is there are plugins for just about every other CMS website out there that makes it easy to build single sign on plugins accept for Linkedin. I manage a developer website that our target audience are members that subscribe to Linkedin, but I can't build an sso for it because your API does not allow email address access.

Thank you for hearing your members requests and I look forward to this option being available so I can leverage Linkedin on our site.

John Bishop's picture
Joined: 2011-09-16
Feb 4, 2012

Hi,

I'm ready to build a site that leverages LinkedIn Groups, discussion and give LinkedIn users exclusive access to login. But guess what - LinkedIn's API doesn't support email contact!

Without the ability to reach users on my site via email, it's simply not worth it. It would be a terrible user experience to ask them for both email validation AND LinkedIn credentials.

But I'm not surprised that was a suggestion - LinkedIn isn't exactly pushing the envelope of user experience!

Reed, buddy, for the sake of your platform and the growth of your user base (still only 120MM?), please consider adding this industry standard feature.

Thanks.

-JB

James Cridland's picture
Joined: 2011-10-09
Feb 5, 2012

Similarly, LinkedIn users have asked for my website to support LinkedIn logins. I cannot do so unless you make email addresses visible. Google and Facebook do not share this unless the user gives permission; there seems no reason why LinkedIn should not support this type of login either, other than (it appears above) dogmatic refusal. Finishing your OAuth2 login system should enable this, and leave the power with the user. You are harming adoption of your system until you do.

Jeremy Johnstone's picture
Joined: 2011-04-17
Feb 7, 2012

Hi Anthony,

So I assume you can't implement SSO for Twitter either then for the same reason? All because of your "dogmatic" (to use another poster's word) refusal to add a single text entry field requesting the user's email address?

-Jeremy

John Bishop's picture
Joined: 2011-09-16
Feb 7, 2012

Jeremy--

You know what's ironic? You can 'sign-up' to LinkedIn with Facebook - and LinkedIn gets your Facebook email address!

Is that why LinkedIn doesn't offer the ability to SSO with Twitter?

It looks like that 'dogma' is present within LinkedIn, just like out here. Get this thing prioritized, already, and eliminate the dogma!

Thanks.

-John

Jeremy Johnstone's picture
Joined: 2011-04-17
Feb 7, 2012

Hi John,

Your opinion is duly noted. Thanks for sharing.

Enjoy!

-Jeremy

Neil Munro's picture
Joined: 2011-10-03
Feb 7, 2012

Hi Jeremy,
As it happens Twitter is different because you don't need an email to contact the user, you can send a Twitter Direct Message and this is what we use (once the user has explicitly opted-in). But in any case I think you're missing the point: adding an email field is not the issue, the problem is that we then have to validate it (along with the usual problems with the confirmation email being caught in spam filters...) before we can send any messages. Our client is an airline and they want to be able to contact customers - not spam them senseless - just contact them via an opt-in system with fine-grained permissions and digest features. We can do that immediately using SSO for Facebook, Twitter and Google but not Linkedin...
Neil.

James Cridland's picture
Joined: 2011-10-09
Feb 10, 2012

"So I assume you can't implement SSO for Twitter either then for the same reason? All because of your "dogmatic" (to use another poster's word) refusal to add a single text entry field requesting the user's email address?" - Jeremy, you're being argumentative and disingenuous here.

The Data Protection Act in the UK requires me to ensure that all the details I have about users are accurate.

When logging in using OAuth2 with Facebook, my users see that I'm requesting their email address, and can make a decision whether they wish to go through with the login process, or cancel it. From my side, I know that this email address is a verified one, and I have no requirement to annoy the user by having to send a validation email - something that cuts user adoption by a significant amount. So, email sharing is done with a user's explicit knowledge and consent, and in a responsible way that encourages users to use Facebook signin, since they know that they've no annoying email validation to undergo. This is good for the user, and good for me.

Whenever they login to my website afterwards, I automatically copy over their latest information to our database: so the details remain accurate (as is my legal requirement), and the user only has to change their email in one place: Facebook. This is good for the user, and good for me.

Since I do not offer username/password login - only using Facebook and Google - we know that some users have actually registered on one of these services to use our site. LinkedIn is particularly relevant for my business-to-business site, since many of our target audience are LinkedIn's, too; we know that if we were able to use LinkedIn as a signin partner, we'd significantly increase our user numbers, but more importantly, LinkedIn's user numbers too. Every user's profile is linked-to from every interaction they make - great for Google+ and Facebook, and again, could be great for LinkedIn, too.

OAuth2 - where I have to specifically request access to a user's email address, and a user has to specifically grant me permission - is the right way to go. As a "developer advocate", you should be aware that a developer's life is made significantly easier if they are able to leverage the simplicity of OAuth2, and the benefit of knowing that a user's email is accurate and validated. You should also be aware that this will benefit LinkedIn, and would not result in any lack of user control of their information. You should see the win-win-win - and an absence of any negativity.

I hope this explains why validated email addresses in the LinkedIn authentication process is a highly desirable point for BOTH developers and LinkedIn users. I'd welcome the opportunity to chat further to me privately if there's still something you don't understand. My email address is james.cridland@mediauk.com

Joined: 2011-08-07
Feb 10, 2012

@ Neil, it seemed that you can also send messages to the LinkedIn inbox using their API, as you can do with Twitter messages.

Still, sending emails to users' LinkedIn inbox is ugly, convoluted, and somewhat greedy of LinkedIn. I will choose not to allow sign-in through LinkedIn.

Neil Munro's picture
Joined: 2011-10-03
Feb 10, 2012

Joseph, yes, I saw that but I agree with you and if this is a ploy to 'encourage' people to use their inbox it is sadly misguided... I'm not happy about using Twitter DMs either, but at least there is a good chance people will read messages sent that way - I don't think I've ever looked at my Linked Inbox and in my view that is not what Linked in is about.

Jeremy Johnstone's picture
Joined: 2011-04-17
Feb 10, 2012

Hi Neil / Joseph,

LinkedIn Inbox emails are sent via email to the users the same way a Twitter DM is notified via email to the user, so the use cases you illustrate are compatible between the two.

-Jeremy

James Cridland's picture
Joined: 2011-10-09
Feb 11, 2012

Jeremy, as a developer advocate, do you plan to respond to the comments I have made?

Kirsten Hunter's picture
Joined: 2011-06-30
Feb 13, 2012

James, we understand your points. We are aware of the potentials provided by a more granular authentication model, and it's something we may implement in the future. As we've said in many places on these forums, however, LinkedIn does not comment on future features or functionality.

Note that since users have multiple email addresses within LinkedIn (and many of them are linkedin@mydomain.com), giving you a single email address is very likely not to match whatever you get from Facebook or Google, and you'll *still* need to ask users which email address they want to use - so exposing this information will not remove this requirement, simply move the work you need to do to a different problem if the email you get from us doesn't match the one you have in your system from another service.

As you know, as a developer, our team has limited resources and our product manager works very hard to assign resources based on the current priorities of our developers. Please be aware that we understand your points. However, just because something will improve some parts of the platform doesn't necessarily make it more important than other priorities and features.

I'm curious to know what the Data Protection Act has to say about users who have emails like linkedin@myname.com, facebook@myname.com, twitter@myname.com or ten different email addresses all associated with the same identity. How do they want you to deal with that? Many users maintain separate emails for different social services.

Kristof Pelckmans's picture
Joined: 2011-11-18
Feb 13, 2012

Hi Kirsten, just curious - what % of all e-mail addresses contain linkedin before the @?

Many thanks,

Kristof

Jeremy Johnstone's picture
Joined: 2011-04-17
Feb 14, 2012

Hi Kristof,

We can't disclose information like that, but I can tell you, from my own connection graph alone, it's above the statistical "noise" level. Same applies for my Facebook social graph too (with some form of "Facebook" or "fb" being in the email address).

-Jeremy

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